Although demolition sites may seem like a disorganized mess, there is actually a method to the madness. Bringing down a building is not only carefully orchestrated, but in-depth research is conducted beforehand. One of the most important considerations to have would be limiting people’s exposure to harmful chemicals. Granted, a contractor worth their salt will already be knowledgeable on the dangers that chemicals pose to their crew as well as the inhabitants of the home. However, this does not mean you should be complacent. New homes tend to be free of all these chemicals, but older homes that are being retrofitted to become up-to-date are a gold mine of toxic hazards. So what are some of the toxic substances to look out for? Synthetic Mineral Fibres These manmade fibres come from materials such as ceramic, wool and fiberglass. These substances may not be as life threatening as asbestos, but they are found in products used for thermal and sound protection. Coming into contact with them can cause eye irritations, throat irritations and irritation to nasal glands. There has also been worry that long-term exposure could lead to lung cancer since these substances contain fiberglass. If you are working on a property that is fraught with synthetic mineral fibbers, your crew should be fitted with respirators as well as protective clothing to limit any contact that they may have with the fibres. Formaldehyde Some house are built with wood that was treated with formaldehyde. This type of wood was typically used in creating panelling. When the panelling is manipulated through sawing or other methods, the wood dust released in the air will be have formaldehyde, too.  During demolition, the wood dust can make its way to nasal passages, and continuous exposure could lead to nasal cancer. Contractors offering these demolition services should always wear respiratory gear, especially when dealing with the panel boards to avoid posing unnecessary risks to their health. Lead The most common culprit of carrying lead is paint. Although most houses will not contain this compound, it tends to be in painted steel beams. Workers who may not be aware of this may go ahead and torch the steel beams during demolition, and this exposes them to airborne lead. If you suspect there may be lead paint on the premises, workers ought to be provided with respiratory gear as well as hand washing stations before engaging their demolition services. For more information and advice, contact a company like Allam’s...